Jane Stickle Triangles, Crops and the Garden

May was a very busy month. Yards to mow, crops to plant, hay to make, garden to plant and, of course, quilts to piece. I’m going to start with quilts first.

IMG_5304I made good progress in May on unfinished projects. Besides the Medallion quilt top I showed you several posts ago, I’ve finished a long time Zig-Zag 9-Patch project that was started many years ago. The intent was to use up older fabrics but this didn’t even put a dent in the stash. He will be gifted to a friend who will add borders and hand quilt him.

 

 

 

IMG_5302I embroidered these quilt blocks years ago. They came 6 in a package but there were only 3 packages available. Using one of my quilting stencils, I marked and embroidered 2 more to make 20 blocks. I’ve cut pieces for flying geese to make the side borders wider; the geese will be leaders and enders for the summer. There will be another border after the geese, but just one step at a time.

 

 

IMG_5306I had to take a break from quilting on Red Radiance. My fingers got too sore and developed some cracks. Ouch! But I could applique.

 

 

 

IMG_5305The light green sashes have been attached and I started appliquing the hearts. Sometime I’m going to get a good photo of this crib quilt. I know I cropped this photo. I guess the computer wanted to show you the green grass!

 

 

IMG_5307With those projects out-of-the-way, it was time to pick up Jane again. I prepped the top row of triangles, started sewing and here they are. I’ve made a few changes. One of the changes was to eliminate the annoyingly narrow white borders that were on some of the triangles. I just cut the pieces longer and extended them into the seam allowance. I need to cut out the alternate plain triangles so the whole row can be sewn together before prepping the next row.

IMG_5330We were able to plant all of the soybeans in the early part of May but corn planting was halted because of rain. When the soil was dry enough to plant the rest of the corn, the hay was ready to be mown. Forty acres of hay made 155 bales which were wrapped. We would have like to have dry baled some hay, but they were calling for rain and we didn’t want to risk getting it ruined. That was the right decision. Hopefully we will be able to dry bale the next cutting. And we did plant the rest of the corn the same week.

IMG_5324Soybeans were no-tilled into the corn stubble in the field south of my garden. I will be showing you their progress over the summer.

I haven’t been very enthused about gardening this year but everything is planted now except for the winter squash. The early planted vegetable are doing fairly well. Some of the early green beans didn’t survive the light frost we got the middle of the month. After the crops were all in, the Farmer was able to help in the garden. My tomato cages never stay upright when the tomato plants are mature. They always fall over because of the weight. The Farmer pounds a fence post into each individual cage to keep it upright.

IMG_5326This year I’m experimenting with growing green beans on this curved fencing panel. (This was also a Farmer job) The idea is the pole beans will grow up the fence and the green beans will hang down so I can easily pick them and save stress on my knees.

IMG_5327The amaryllis bulbs have been transplanted into the garden. I try to keep the soil from the pots intact and set the roots/potting soil into the hole, cover with soil, then mulch. They normally just sit there for several weeks and I worry that I’ve killed them. The roots are growing into the surrounding soil. Once the roots have spread out, they send up new green leaves. They have all survived.

The west end of the garden IMG_5329is planted with broccoli plants I started and transplanted into the garden. Once the plants are full size, I’ll plant winter squash seeds into the paths between the broccoli plants. About the time the broccoli is finished yielding, the squash should really be taking off and spread over the broccoli plants, I hope anyway. On the east side of the broccoli is a row of early red potatoes. Yukon Gold potatoes were planted later and haven’t popped up yet. As you can see, we’ve been receiving plenty of rain.

This is what happened in May here on the farm. What is happening this first week of June? We’re busy making memories with 6 of our grandchildren!

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5 thoughts on “Jane Stickle Triangles, Crops and the Garden

  1. Your Jane Stickle triangles are coming along very quickly considering how much other work you have been doing this past month. I foundation pieced a lot of mine and did add the wretched little strips to make them big enough. Might take a different approach next time.
    Before sewing all the triangles together, read Anina’s method to attach the triangle border to the rest of the quilt. This is the first post I came across for thatquilt.com. Mine went together so easily using this approach.
    http://thatquilt.blogspot.ca/2011/01/triangle-wrangling.html

  2. I have my amaryllis in a pot outside – do you think it should be planted directly into the ground for it to flower next winter? you have a big farm and a lot of work it looks like to me. Love your scrappy quilt and your triangles

    • I just always transplant mine into the ground in the summer. That way I don’t have to remember to water them. My MIL didn’t do that, but hers bloomed too. Do whichever is most convenient for you. I dig mine out the end of September, early October so they don’t get frosted. Your growing season is longer than ours. I’ve always let mine go dormant for at least 6 weeks. I don’t know how they would do if they don’t have a rest.

  3. What a busy but productive time you have had. I love your triangle blocks! Just beautiful. I wonder why I’ve seemed to be so busy but haven’t accomplished anything. I did get sew-re of the month at Erica’s showing my Dear Jane Quilt. I was surprised how many people have never heard of a Dear Jane Quilt before. It was nice to hear how much they liked mine though. Enjoy the grands! I’m going to pick up mine tomorrow.

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